Let’s Get Sticky…

STICKY CAMPUS ROADSHOW

Following 2 successful years as the Digital Classroom Roadshow, the Sticky Campus Roadshow will extend digital capabilities to all campus learning spaces.

STICKY CAMPUS NEWSLETTER

Sign up using the form above for free monthly information on many aspects of “The Sticky Campus” delivered straight to your in-box.

STICKY CAMPUS BOOK

A book on the experiences of the Sticky Campus Roadshow will be published in 2018.  In the meantime “Creating the Digital Campus” was published on 1st September 2017.

STICKY CAMPUS SUPPORTERS

The Sticky Campus is an initiative from Droitwich.net, but would not be possible without the support of these companies.
ABOUT The Sticky Campus Roadshow is a natural successor to the Digital Classroom Roadshow that has toured universities throughout the UK from October 2015 to June 2017.  Whilst the Digital Classroom Roadshow - as you might guess from the name - focused on helping universities and colleges make better informed decisions about their developments of individual technology-rich active learning rooms, the Sticky Campus extends the concept to the whole campus; to collaborative auditoriums, to self-study areas in libraries and social spaces.  The Sticky Campus Roadshow (and Newsletter and Book) will also include solutions that make the space more inclusive for all students, including those with learning differences who utilise assistive hardware and software technologies that make learning possible. The Digital Classroom Roadshow comprised of a complete active learning room being installed on a university site for approximately four weeks at a time.    Into an empty room we installed six collaborative tables, each with a wireless receiver, high quality 40”/42” screen, charging points, and six chairs, creating a student-centric learning environment for thirty-six participants where active learning enabled by wireless digital technology can flourish.  There was also a lectern with the necessary technology to make the visual content flow around the room, a visualiser to change the engagement when required, and a large front-of-class screen.  With just one standard network cable, everything was configured to work with the host’s Eduroam infrastructure, and this authentic fully-functional room with connectivity to the VLE and the internet was created. To my knowledge, nothing had been attempted on this scale as a nomadic showcase before, and a typical installation looked like this one hosted at the University of Dundee during June 2017. How did this come about?    There were two main reasons why I came up with the innovation of the digital classroom roadshow. 1. Previously, to help determine how a fully-connected active learning room might function, the typical approach was to hold a mini-exhibition on campus.  Now academics and other stakeholders could compare a range of technology, furniture, etc., within a short space of time.   These events did not recreate what a delivered solution might look like, and in fact often caused more confusion for academics by having multiple technologies being exhibited in isolation around the room. 2. Back in 2006, I had been involved in supplying bleeding-edge collaborative technology to the Visual Learning Lab at Nottingham University.  This project was one of over 60 Centres of Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CETL) receiving between them a total of £310 million of funding from HEFCE to advance learning and teaching.  Many CETLs were built around niche projects that created some great engagements, but which failed to gain adoption even on their own campuses, let alone across the sector, and so the opportunity to influence changes in both behaviour and culture were lost.  In fact, the executive summary from the CETL’s Final Report stated that not a single cross-sector benefit had been achieved by the project. Coupled with the fact that advances in wireless collaboration and screen technology were providing an opportunity to equip active learning rooms to make better use of and improve digital capabilities, both experiences contributed to the ‘lightbulb moment’ about creating a new style of engagement that would help universities and colleges to make better informed decisions about their own campus developments.  My idea seemed sensible (to me!), but would it be possible?  Could it be funded? And would there be any demand from universities for this resource? From Rochdale to Ocho Rios…! Well not quite, but in year one, roadshows were hosted by the universities of Teesside, Ulster, West of England, Lancaster, Heriot-Watt and De Montfort, and in the second year by Lincoln, The Royal Agricultural, South Wales, Kent, Staffordshire, Bristol and Dundee.  We also spent a week in central London hosted at RIBA’s prestigious headquarters in Portland Place, and extended activities to the corporate sector, where many businesses are starting to take notice of the changes in HE, and changing the way they conduct their own in-house training. Feedback from previous roadshow hosts can be found under the Roadshow menu. Isn’t it just new furniture and technology? Look a little deeper than just the furniture and technology, and the digital classroom roadshow is really something more valuable.  It’s an opportunity for the host university to expose hundreds of people from across the campus to: Help determine what future learning spaces might look like Discover how students can be engaged more fully in their learning Considering existing digital skills and what developments are needed Arrive at better informed decisions on future learning space requirement, pedagogical developments, and strategies around student engagement and success. And all this valuable insight into new learning spaces, the re-design of curriculum, timetabling issues, etc., actually takes place in a new collaborative learning space!  It still amazes me that conferences on both ‘future learning spaces’ and ‘future workspaces’ take place in traditional lecture theatres and break-out classrooms with their rows and columns of seats.  The Digital Classroom Roadshow provided an authentic ‘new learning space’ experience. AUDE and others have recognised that these rooms not only benefit learning and teaching, but they signpost the direction of travel that a university is heading in order to provide today’s students with a fit-for-purpose learning environment that takes technology and developing pedagogies into account. The Sticky Campus Roadshow will delve deeper into the issues around learning and teaching, and especially those - including furniture and technology developments - that drive forward inclusivity for all learners.  We will use the same Kramer VIA technology that allows students to connect and collaborate from virtually any device and intuitively become fully engaged.  For those technically minded, we will demonstrate how information flowing around the room can be better managed using an IP Streaming configuration that also reduces down-time in the event of hardware failure. On the home page of this website I stated that the “Teaching Excellence Framework is contributing towards this significant rethink in campus design.”  This is because many of the proven benefits that flow from active learning within a digitally rich environment, such as the digital classroom and other spaces that the Sticky Campus Roadshow will feature, make positive impacts towards TEF outcomes; student engagement, quality of learning spaces, digital capabilities, employability, student retention, learning gain and final attainment, etc..  
© Droitwich.net - 2017
University of Dundee June 2017
© Droitwich.net - 2017
ABOUT The Sticky Campus Roadshow is a natural successor to the Digital Classroom Roadshow that has toured universities throughout the UK from October 2015 to June 2017.  Whilst the Digital Classroom Roadshow - as you might guess from the name - focused on helping universities and colleges make better informed decisions about their developments of individual technology-rich active learning rooms, the Sticky Campus extends the concept to the whole campus; to collaborative auditoriums, to self-study areas in libraries and social spaces.  The Sticky Campus Roadshow (and Newsletter and Book) will also include solutions that make the space more inclusive for all students, including those with learning differences who utilise assistive hardware and software technologies that make learning possible. The Digital Classroom Roadshow comprised of a complete active learning room being installed on a university site for approximately four weeks at a time.    Into an empty room we installed six collaborative tables, each with a wireless receiver, high quality 40”/42” screen, charging points, and six chairs, creating a student-centric learning environment for thirty-six participants where active learning enabled by wireless digital technology can flourish.  There was also a lectern with the necessary technology to make the visual content flow around the room, a visualiser to change the engagement when required, and a large front-of-class screen.  With just one standard network cable, everything was configured to work with the host’s Eduroam infrastructure, and this authentic fully-functional room with connectivity to the VLE and the internet was created. To my knowledge, nothing had been attempted on this scale as a nomadic showcase before, and a typical installation looked like this one hosted at the University of Dundee during June 2017. How did this come about?    There were two main reasons why I came up with the innovation of the digital classroom roadshow. 1. Previously, to help determine how a fully- connected active learning room might function, the typical approach was to hold a mini-exhibition on campus.  Now academics and other stakeholders could compare a range of technology, furniture, etc., within a short space of time.   These events did not recreate what a delivered solution might look like, and in fact often caused more confusion for academics by having multiple technologies being exhibited in isolation around the room. 2. Back in 2006, I had been involved in supplying bleeding-edge collaborative technology to the Visual Learning Lab at Nottingham University.  This project was one of over 60 Centres of Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CETL) receiving between them a total of £310 million of funding from HEFCE to advance learning and teaching.  Many CETLs were built around niche projects that created some great engagements, but which failed to gain adoption even on their own campuses, let alone across the sector, and so the opportunity to influence changes in both behaviour and culture were lost.  In fact, the executive summary from the CETL’s Final Report stated that not a single cross- sector benefit had been achieved by the project. Coupled with the fact that advances in wireless collaboration and screen technology were providing an opportunity to equip active learning rooms to make better use of and improve digital capabilities, both experiences contributed to the ‘lightbulb moment’ about creating a new style of engagement that would help universities and colleges to make better informed decisions about their own campus developments.  My idea seemed sensible (to me!), but would it be possible?  Could it be funded? And would there be any  demand from universities for this resource? From Rochdale to Ocho Rios…! Well not quite, but in year one, roadshows were hosted by the universities of Teesside, Ulster, West of England, Lancaster, Heriot-Watt and De Montfort, and in the second year by Lincoln, The Royal Agricultural, South Wales, Kent, Staffordshire, Bristol and Dundee.  We also spent a week in central London hosted at RIBA’s prestigious headquarters in Portland Place, and extended activities to the corporate sector, where many businesses are starting to take notice of the changes in HE, and changing the way they conduct their own in- house training. Feedback from previous roadshow hosts can be found under the Roadshow menu. Isn’t it just new furniture and technology? Look a little deeper than just the furniture and technology, and the digital classroom roadshow is really something more valuable.  It’s an opportunity for the host university to expose hundreds of people from across the campus to: Help determine what future learning spaces might look like Discover how students can be engaged more fully in their learning Considering existing digital skills and what developments are needed Arrive at better informed decisions on future learning space requirement, pedagogical developments, and strategies around student engagement and success. And all this valuable insight into new learning spaces, the re-design of curriculum, timetabling issues, etc., actually takes place in a new collaborative learning space!  It still amazes me that conferences on both ‘future learning spaces’ and ‘future workspaces’ take place in traditional lecture theatres and break-out classrooms with their rows and columns of seats.  The Digital Classroom Roadshow provided an authentic ‘new learning space’ experience. AUDE and others have recognised that these rooms not only benefit learning and teaching, but they signpost the direction of travel that a university is heading in order to provide today’s students with a fit-for-purpose learning environment that takes technology and developing pedagogies into account. The Sticky Campus Roadshow will delve deeper into the issues around learning and teaching, and especially those - including furniture and technology developments - that drive forward inclusivity for all learners.  We will use the same Kramer VIA technology that allows students to connect and collaborate from virtually any device and intuitively become fully engaged.  For those technically minded, we will demonstrate how information flowing around the room can be better managed using an IP Streaming configuration that also reduces down-time in the event of hardware failure. On the home page of this website I stated that the “Teaching Excellence Framework is contributing towards this significant rethink in campus design.”  This is because many of the proven benefits that flow from active learning within a digitally rich environment, such as the digital classroom and other spaces that the Sticky Campus Roadshow will feature, make positive impacts towards TEF outcomes; student engagement, quality of learning spaces, digital capabilities, employability, student retention, learning gain and final attainment, etc..  
University of Dundee June 2017
Let’s Get Sticky…

STICKY CAMPUS ROADSHOW

Following 2 successful years as the Digital Classroom Roadshow, the Sticky Campus Roadshow will extend digital capabilities to all campus learning spaces.

STICKY CAMPUS NEWSLETTER

Sign up using the form above for free monthly information on many aspects of “The Sticky Campus” delivered straight to your in-box.

STICKY CAMPUS BOOK

A book on the experiences of the Sticky Campus Roadshow will be published in 2018.  In the meantime “Creating the Digital Campus” was published on 1st September 2017.

STICKY CAMPUS SUPPORTERS

The Sticky Campus is an initiative from Droitwich.net, but would not be possible without the support of these companies.